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Colette Y. Pi`ipi`i Machado


Office of Hawaiian Affairs
Moloka`i andLana`i

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Moloka`i - Land of My Birth

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The Moloka`i Land Trust
By
Trustee Colette Y. Machado

Two years ago a group of Molokai residents got together to discuss the islands growing need for more access to health care services.  The group formed a board calling themselves Molokai Ohana Health Care.  The group began conducting interviews with individual residents, church groups and community leaders to assess health care needs and possible solutions.  Information gathered from the community was used to complete an application for federal grant funding.

Molokai will be joining a strong network of well established federally funded health centers in Hawaii including two of the oldest centers; Bay Clinic in Hilo and the Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center on Oahu. Bay Clinic has satellites in Pahoa, Ke`eau and Kau and has won national recognition for its programs.  Waianae Coast is well known for its cultural and dietary programs for Native Hawaiians.  There are ten (10) centers with 34 locations throughout the State.  These health centers are the largest"safety net" providers in Hawaii, serving over 67,000 patients annually.  To help these facilities meet the needs of their communities, there are purchasing programs and drug discount plans that have been developed specifically for community health centers by the Hawaii Primary Care Association and the Hawaii Department of Health.  More importantly, Hawaii’s community health centers also form an `ohana whose members quickly lend support and technical assistance to one another. 

Earlier this year, Senator Inouye announced that Molokai Ohana Health Care had secured a federal grant and will receive $565,750.00 to fund its community health center.  Other recipients of federal monies are health centers on Kauai, Maui and Oahu.  The USDA, Rural Utilities Service has also granted Molokai Ohana Health Care an award of $283,500.00 for dental equipment and state-of-the-art teleradiology equipment.  Other organizations providing support to the center are the Primary Care Association of Hawaii and the Molokai Enterprise Community.

March 20, 2004 will mark the blessing of the Molokai Community Health Center in Kaunakakai.  Project leaders say the clinic will serve an estimated 3,400 people during its first year of operation. Annual funding for the community health center is expected to be in limited to $650,000. 

The Molokai Community Health Center will offer primary medical, dental and behavioral services.  Along the lines of Molokai’s demographic configuration, the target population for the health center is the uninsured and the underinsured.  According to Primary Care Association officials, about 11 percent of Hawaii’s population have no health insurance.  Molokai’s unemployment rate being the highest in the state makes residents less likely to have the necessary health coverage.  Staff at the Health Center will be able to provide patients with assistance in applying for insurance or preparing payment plans according to a sliding fee scale.

Basic services provided by all Health Centers that are federally qualified include primary medical care, health education, case management, language translation, outreach, and eligibility assistance. Health care services are not meant to be free, but patients who are unable to pay for services will not be turned away.
Additional services offered through the Molokai Community Health Center will be determined by the community.  Other community health centers in Hawaii have expanded their services to include adult day care, youth programs, fitness program, diabetes and asthma education, heart disease and prevention services and women’s health services.  Decisions on future operations of the Center will be made by the Board of directors.  Board members are comprised of Molokai residents whom 51% must actually use the center’s services.  Through this provision, residents have a voice in guiding the health center toward serving the growing needs of the Molokai community.

From a community vision in 1998, a group of volunteers planned and built a grassroots nonprofit organization in 2006 – The Moloka`i Land Trust.

Land trusts are a collaborative effort between the community, private funders, government and volunteers.  Conservation land trusts such as the Moloka`i Land Trust (MLT) take significant environmental and cultural lands off the real estate market to preserve cultural and natural resources and provide access to the community.

The mission of MLT is to protect and restore land, natural and cultural resources of Moloka`i and to perpetuate the unique Native Hawaiian traditions of the island for the benefit of future generations of all Moloka`i, particularly Native Hawaiians."The protection of this land is not just for us, it is for the future generations to experience," says board member Davianna McGregor. The Moloka`i Land Trust works to conserve and protect these significant lands on behalf of Moloka`i residents. The Moloka`i Land Trust board and committees are composed of volunteer Moloka`i residents with cultural and subsistence perspectives, land management experience, and just plain hard workers who donate hundreds of hours to preserve and protect a part of Moloka`i.

MLT’s all-volunteer nonprofit organization is entering a new phase as they are on the brink of receiving the ownership title to two land parcels. A 1,600-acre area called Mokio and a 196-acre property called Kawaikapu. The Mokio acquisition includes some of the most pristine and environmentally sensitive land on Moloka`i’s north shore and includes 5 miles of spectacular, rugged and remote coastal strand ecosystem, coastal cliffs, and tidal pools making it one of the priority sites for inclusion in the land trust. 

The donated Mokio parcel is a significant subsistence-gathering site with an extensive tidal pool system as well as numerous koa or fishing shrines intact with offerings. An important, large ancient adze quarry and habitat complex exists at Pu`u Ka`eo. The ecosystem includes many bird nesting locations and nearly an acre of `ihi`ihi lauakea, estimated to be the largest growth site of this rare endangered endemic Hawaiian plant in the islands."To Moloka`i, and the State of Hawai`i, the cultural, environmental and culture-based agricultural value of the Kawaikapu watershed is astronomical," says board member Billy Akutagawa.

The Kawaikapu parcel is located on the southeast side of Moloka`i and encompasses an endangered watershed. The Kawaikapu property runs from the mountain headwaters at the 2,100-foot elevation along the entire length of the stream for 6.5 miles down to sea level. MLT raised $1.2 million from the Legacy Lands Commission and Maui County Open Spaces Fund to purchase the privately owned east end property.

To manage the new acquisitions, MLT has hired two staff members to oversee land transfers, execute due diligence and manage administrative tasks."Now that MLT has a binding agreement with Moloka`i Properties Ltd. to gift the 1,600 acres of north shore property and are completing the due diligence process for the land, we needed full-time staff to begin to manage and protect the land in perpetuity so we hired two staff members last month," adds Akutagawa. The newly hired staff can develop and implement the process to allow access, and develop monitoring plans for the cultural and natural resources.

Conservation land trusts are a win-win solution for the community, future generations and the `äina.  Successful protection of the two parcels would ensure the preservation of the entire watershed into perpetuity. The Trust will create and steward a land legacy to help keep Moloka`i, Moloka`i – today and for generations to come.

From a community vision in 1998, a group of volunteers planned and built a grassroots nonprofit organization in 2006 – The Moloka`i Land Trust.

Land trusts are a collaborative effort between the community, private funders, government and volunteers.  Conservation land trusts such as the Moloka`i Land Trust (MLT) take significant environmental and cultural lands off the real estate market to preserve cultural and natural resources and provide access to the community.

The mission of MLT is to protect and restore land, natural and cultural resources of Moloka`i and to perpetuate the unique Native Hawaiian traditions of the island for the benefit of future generations of all Moloka`i, particularly Native Hawaiians."The protection of this land is not just for us, it is for the future generations to experience," says board member Davianna McGregor. The Moloka`i Land Trust works to conserve and protect these significant lands on behalf of Moloka`i residents. The Moloka`i Land Trust board and committees are composed of volunteer Moloka`i residents with cultural and subsistence perspectives, land management experience, and just plain hard workers who donate hundreds of hours to preserve and protect a part of Moloka`i.

MLT’s all-volunteer nonprofit organization is entering a new phase as they are on the brink of receiving the ownership title to two land parcels. A 1,600-acre area called Mokio and a 196-acre property called Kawaikapu. The Mokio acquisition includes some of the most pristine and environmentally sensitive land on Moloka`i’s north shore and includes 5 miles of spectacular, rugged and remote coastal strand ecosystem, coastal cliffs, and tidal pools making it one of the priority sites for inclusion in the land trust. 

The donated Mokio parcel is a significant subsistence-gathering site with an extensive tidal pool system as well as numerous koa or fishing shrines intact with offerings. An important, large ancient adze quarry and habitat complex exists at Pu`u Ka`eo. The ecosystem includes many bird nesting locations and nearly an acre of `ihi`ihi lauäkea, estimated to be the largest growth site of this rare endangered endemic Hawaiian plant in the islands."To Moloka`i, and the State of Hawai`i, the cultural, environmental and culture-based agricultural value of the Kawaikapu watershed is astronomical," says board member Billy Akutagawa.

The Kawaikapu parcel is located on the southeast side of Moloka`i and encompasses an endangered watershed. The Kawaikapu property runs from the mountain headwaters at the 2,100-foot elevation along the entire length of the stream for 6.5 miles down to sea level. MLT raised $1.2 million from the Legacy Lands Commission and Maui County Open Spaces Fund to purchase the privately owned east end property.

To manage the new acquisitions, MLT has hired two staff members to oversee land transfers, execute due diligence and manage administrative tasks."Now that MLT has a binding agreement with Moloka`i Properties Ltd. to gift the 1,600 acres of north shore property and are completing the due diligence process for the land, we needed full-time staff to begin to manage and protect the land in perpetuity so we hired two staff members last month," adds Akutagawa. The newly hired staff can develop and implement the process to allow access, and develop monitoring plans for the cultural and natural resources.

Conservation land trusts are a win-win solution for the community, future generations and the `äina.  Successful protection of the two parcels would ensure the preservation of the entire watershed into perpetuity. The Trust will create and steward a land legacy to help keep Moloka`i, Moloka`i – today and for generations to come.

Articles by Colette

OHA Volunteers on Molokai and Lanai
By Trustee Colette Y. Machado

Aia ke ola i ka hana, Labor produces what is needed. Olelo No`eau

On Saturday August 25th, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs is having a special Mahalo ceremony for our volunteers from the islands of Molokai and Lanai.  Although the Lanai office is still fairly new, Pearl Ah Ho the Community Resource Coordinator (CRC), has already amassed a handful of helping hands.  In appreciation of their love and support, the Lanai CRC and her faithful followers will travel to Molokai by ferry to join Molokai volunteers in the modest ceremony.

When asked to say a few word about the volunteers on her island, Pearl was longwinded and encouraging. "The volunteers from Lana`i are two state retirees, a kupuna hailed from Oregon, a produce entrepreneur, a Cultural Resources Manager, a food server, and an 11th grade student".  Mr. & Mrs. John Basques, Lorraine Dyer, Alberta deJetley, Noelani Watanabe, Jeremy Higaki and Tristan Lopes all became volunteers because they wanted to help."How can I help?" That`s all it took for them to become volunteers. "Not all of them are beneficiaries with the koko but they are all beneficiaries at heart," added Pearl.

Pearl`s diverse supporters are always willing to lend a hand, registering beneficiaries for Kau Inoa and Hawaiian Registry.  The volunteers provide assistance in the opening of the new office by doing whatever asked, from arranging flowers to small-scale carpentry.  Pearl is quick to add the all services come with"a smile that will melt your heart".  While hurricane Flossie caused the cancellation of August`s Board of Trustees annual visit, the volunteers were critical in the preparation process.  With the rescheduling of the Board’s annual Lanai community meeting to November, these volunteers are priceless.

Meanwhile the Molokai OHA office has an army to thank also.  Irene Kaahanui calls her volunteers"arch angels." "Our volunteers are the heartbeat of our networking team.  In our operations we have a saying that"there are no barriers that we cannot over come".  Irene believes its,"because we always pull together as a team." "Whatever the situation is, whether it’s for resource purposes, or be it the right hands of our projects - they are right there for us."

Irene knows that she can count on her volunteers for anything, even spiritual words, or words of encouragement.  Technical and clerical support, putting up signs or gathering beneficiaries for Kau Inoa, the Molokai volunteers are a phone call away. "Our volunteers love us," she adds.  "We all feel the pride of being a part of our community, our commitment to our beneficiaries and peers, and more so to our Trustee and her staff on Oahu."   Our volunteers are the spirit and essence of our Molokai OHA office.  

 Irene notes that she cannot mention all of the people who’ve been a part of the effort, but the following individuals have been a blessing in the past year:  Anna Lou Arakaki, Lolly Kaai, Judy Caparida, Gayla Ann Haliniak, Cecilia Ellertsen, Edwina Cacoulidis, Ruth Manu, Sherry Sasada, Mickey Pauole, Alvin Burrows, Gay Kaopuiki, Myron Akutagawa, Kapena Johnston, and John Keohuloa.


Mahalo to all those who take the time out of their busy lives to help our offices on Molokai and Lanai.  We appreciate you for your time, your words of encouragement, and especially your commitment.


Milton Pa - Moloka`i DHHL Commissioner, 2000-2008
By Trustee Colette Y. Machado

Aloha kakou! June 30 marked the end of a milestone for Molokai`s Milton Pa. After eight years of serving as a commissioner for the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands, his term has ended.  Those of you who know him, or have been touched by him, can relate to and appreciate his dedication to serving the community. 

Milton Pa was appointed as a commissioner to the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands in July of 2000. It was the first of two terms he would serve representing the homestead communities on the island of Moloka`i. Like most commissions, the Hawaiian Homes Commission is made up of a group volunteers, appointed by the Governor and approved by the Senate, who try their best to represent the beneficiaries in the executive decisions of the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands. 

Milton is a Moloka`i boy, born and raised on a homestead that was passed down from generation to generation. His grandparents were among the first group of homestead settlers to arrive on Moloka`i in 1924. His grandfather was originally from Laupahoehoe on Hawai`i, while his grandmother hailed from Kane`ohe, O`ahu. They were brave and resourceful like most pioneers, and moved to build a new life on their 40 acres in Ho`olehua. From his grandfather, the land was passed on to his grandmother, then to his father, then his mother and now to him. 

Milton spent his formidable years growing up on the homestead, attending Kualapuu School and eventually graduating from Moloka`i High School in 1956. He continued with his education at Church College of Hawaii in La`ie, and received a bachelor`s of science degree. Education became his life’s passion; Milton spent the next 35 years in Hawai`i`s Department of Education.  Kahuku, Halawa and Kaunakakai elementary schools are among the schools he’s had the opportunity to call home. He served as a district resource teacher and a Hawaiian studies teacher from 1990 to 1998. The list of community organizations on his resume are too numerous to name individually, but his dedication to public service in education is the theme throughout. 

In terms of his accomplishments as a commissioner, Milton is most proud of his participation in the development of the Home Ownership Assistance Program (HOAP)."When I was first appointed to the commission, my biggest concern was the delinquency rate, it was so high. We wanted to keep the beneficiaries on the land, we had to help them," he said."Some of the policies of the department were different in those days, the people would get their award and build their homes, only to end up struggling with the financial commitment."

Community Health Center to serve Molokai Residents
By Trustee Colette Y. Machado

Two years ago a group of Molokai residents got together to discuss the islands growing need for more access to health care services.  The group formed a board calling themselves Molokai Ohana Health Care.  The group began conducting interviews with individual residents, church groups and community leaders to assess health care needs and possible solutions.  Information gathered from the community was used to complete an application for federal grant funding.

Molokai will be joining a strong network of well established federally funded health centers in Hawaii including two of the oldest centers; Bay Clinic in Hilo and the Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center on Oahu. Bay Clinic has satellites in Pahoa, Ke`eau and Kau and has won national recognition for its programs.  Waianae Coast is well known for its cultural and dietary programs for Native Hawaiians.  There are ten (10) centers with 34 locations throughout the State.  These health centers are the largest"safety net" providers in Hawaii, serving over 67,000 patients annually.  To help these facilities meet the needs of their communities, there are purchasing programs and drug discount plans that have been developed specifically for community health centers by the Hawaii Primary Care Association and the Hawaii Department of Health.  More importantly, Hawaii’s community health centers also form a hosanna whose members quickly lend support and technical assistance to one another. 

Earlier this year, Senator Inouye announced that Molokai Ohana Health Care had secured a federal grant and will receive $565,750.00 to fund its community health center.  Other recipients of federal monies are health centers on Kauai, Maui and Oahu.  The USDA, Rural Utilities Service has also granted Molokai Ohana Health Care an award of $283,500.00 for dental equipment and state-of-the-art teleradiology equipment.  Other organizations providing support to the center are the Primary Care Association of Hawaii and the Molokai Enterprise Community.
March 20, 2004 will mark the blessing of the Molokai Community Health Center in Kaunakakai.  Project leaders say the clinic will serve an estimated 3,400 people during its first year of operation. Annual funding for the community health center is expected to be in limited to $650,000. 

The Molokai Community Health Center will offer primary medical, dental and behavioral services.  Along the lines of Molokai’s demographic configuration, the target population for the health center is the uninsured and the underinsured.  According to Primary Care Association officials, about 11 percent of Hawaii’s population have no health insurance.  Molokai’s unemployment rate being the highest in the state makes residents less likely to have the necessary health coverage.  Staff at the Health Center will be able to provide patients with assistance in applying for insurance or preparing payment plans according to a sliding fee scale.

Basic services provided by all Health Centers that are federally qualified include primary medical care, health education, case management, language translation, outreach, and eligibility assistance. Health care services are not meant to be free, but patients who are unable to pay for services will not be turned away.

Additional services offered through the Molokai Community Health Center will be determined by the community.  Other community health centers in Hawaii have expanded their services to include adult day care, youth programs, fitness program, diabetes and asthma education, heart disease and prevention services and women’s health services.  Decisions on future operations of the Center will be made by the Board of directors.  Board members are comprised of Molokai residents whom 51% must actually use the center’s services.  Through this provision, residents have a voice in guiding the health center toward serving the growing needs of the Molokai community.

E lawe ike a`o malama, a e `oi mau ka na`auao. 
He who takes his teachings and applies them increases his knowledge.
By Trustee Colette Y. Machado

E kanu I ka huli `oli ha`ule ka ua.  Plant the taro stalks while there is rain.  Olelo No`eau

Molokai native plaintiffs filed legal action to protect Molokai’s coral reefs and coastal resources. The leeward coast of Molokai sustains residents with a bounty of seaweed and fish along its coast.  It is their belief that if the aquifer levels drop, it would have irreversible adverse impact on the reefs and shorelines.  Molokai residents still rely heavily on our reefs and shorelines to supplement our traditional lifestyles. For several years the Hawaii Supreme Court has deliberated over the Contested Case Hearing on Water Use, Well Construction, and Pump Installation Permit Applications, Filed by Waiola O Molokai, Inc. and Molokai Ranch, Limited.  The challenge from appellants DHHL, and interveners including OHA and ten (10) Molokai residents stemmed from Molokai Ranch’s ability to satisfy conditions for the water permit to whether the Commission's decision sufficiently protected native Hawaiians' traditional and customary gathering rights, as guaranteed by the HHCA.

On January 29, 2004 the high court rendered a unanimous decision that charged the Commission with falling short in several areas of applicable statutes, codes and standards.  The decision ordered that the approval given by the state Water Resource Management Commission for the Molokai water project be vacated and that the issue be referred back to the commission for further consideration.    

Native Hawaiian Legal Corporation attorney Alan Murakami represented seven of the 10 Molokai interveners appellants. "The Waiola decision is phenomenal.  It confirms that the DHHL and Hawaiians trying to pursue their cultural heritage by continuing the traditions and customs of their ancestors along the shoreline are in the driver`s seat in preserving important water resources.  The commercial interests on Moloka`i cannot trump these Hawaiian values.  Moloka`i once again leads the way in enforcing the water rights of Hawaiians."

In its opinion, the court concurred with the 10-intervener appellants whereby the Commission, "failed adequately to discharge its public trust duty to protect native Hawaiians' traditional and customary gathering rights."  It also stated that the conclusion"erroneously placed the burden on the interveners to establish that the proposed use would abridge or deny their traditional and customary gathering rights. 

Another major issue of debate was whether or not the Water Commission’s decision violated DHHL's existing and future reservation rights.  DHHL maintains that the Water Commission is subject to set aside adequate reservations of water to meet DHHL's current and future needs and to insure that other users did not interfere with this water.  The court contends that the reservations of water constitute a public trust purpose and that the decisions of the Commission shall "incorporate and protect adequate reserves of water for current and foreseeable development and use of Hawaiian home lands." 

This decision extended the public trust protection that it affirmed in the Waiahole Ditch Case to the water rights of the Native Hawaiian people and confirmed that the Commission is obligated to ensure that all its actions protected the rights of Native Hawaiians.

Native Hawaiian water rights and traditional and customary gathering rights are still protected by the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act, the Hawaii Constitution and the Hawaii Revised Statutes.  In our ever-changing world, preserving our water resources is an important part of maintaining our culture and our way of life on Molokai.  E kanu mea `ai o nana keiki I ka ha`i.  Plant edible food plants lest your children look with longing at someone else`s.

A Community-Based Tourism Plan for Moloka`i
By Trustee Colette Y. Machado

Community-Based Tourism:"a process by which a community is empowered to share its greatness while preserving its dignity . . . and driven by a genuine desire of a community to share itself, its history, traditions, and customs with strangers, as a means by which to support economic growth."
- Peter Apo, Native Hawaiian Hospitality Association

Moloka`i has recently completed a unique community-based tourism plan.  Its centerpiece is the hiring of a visitor coordinator who will work closely with a community taskforce to perpetuate, enhance, as well as create local events and activities that could attract and sustain an increased visitor count. A primary responsibility of this position will be the development, implementation, and promotion of organized, community-based activities, such as softball tournaments, high school and community athletic events and tournaments, class reunions of local high schools, family reunions, cultural exchange/educational tours, and small, local conferences.  The coordinator will also network with the community to enhance ongoing events like the Moloka`i Hoe and opportunities to work side by side in fishponds, taro patches and family farms. 

The elements of community-based tourism for Moloka`i was first outlined in 1999 under the leadership of the late Greg Helm when our community developed a grant which resulted in what is now the Ke `Aupuni Lokahi-Moloka`i Enterprise Community.  With an average occupancy of 25%, a vision was developed to find a niche in the visitor industry market to continually attract visitors who would appreciate the special, unspoiled qualities of quiet and relaxed rural island living. 

The community recognizes that our greatest asset is the hospitality of our people, our beautiful natural environment and resources, and our rich cultural heritage and traditions.

Moloka`i wants to attract visitors who will respect our island as the last"Hawaiian" Island".  The feeling of `ohana and belonging is an important part of the cultural experience on the island.  Visitors can interact with local residents in a social environment on an intimate scale.  The community should be welcome at all places that visitors have access.  In fact, events should be planned as community events in which visitors are welcome to participate.

Agriculture is an important foundation of the island`s economy, including cultural agriculture - taro patches and fishponds.  Regional food products and Native Hawaiian cuisine are additional attractions of the island that can be expanded to enhance the island`s economy. 

The paniolo experience is another unique feature of Moloka`i, historically and currently and continues to be accessible through activities at Molokai Ranch.

The single most important opportunity to expand visitor activities on Moloka`i is the re-opening of the Kaluakoi Hotel by Molokai Properties Limited scheduled for December 2007.

Rising above the varied tourism issues on Molokai, is the expanding sale of Molokai properties at escalated prices.  For this reason, kama`aina who already have homes in Hawai’i would be the ideal visitor to attract to Moloka`i, including the Kaluakoi Hotel.

A popular bumper sticker sums up the sentiment of most of the longtime residents of Moloka`i:
"Moloka`i: Not for Sale. Just Visit. Our economy and lifestyle depend on it."

The plan recognizes the need to separate the sale of real property on the island from visitor activities.

The success of the plan will be measured with an increase in the number of jobs and enterprises related to the visitor industry and an increase in contributions to the island’s economy from visitor activities and retail purchases.  In the final analysis, the challenge is to"Keep Moloka`i Moloka`i" while expanding visitor activities that will diversify and enhance a sustainable economy for the island of Moloka`i.

Editors Note: Trustee Colette Machado offered her column space to Dr. Davianna McGregor, of the University of Hawaii`s Ethnic Studies Department, who has prepared a community-based visitor plan for Molokai. Dr. McGregor along with colleagues Dr’s Jon Mastuoka and Luciano Minerbi, also co-authored the 1998 publishing of Molokai: a study of Hawaiian subsistence and community sustainability."

Former Molokai Resident finds connection to Hawaii through literacy
By Trustee Colette Y. Machado

Recent U.S. Census data show that little less than half of all Hawaiians are now located on the continental United States.  Although most mainland-Hawaiians live on the west coast, I’ve managed to connect with a former Molokai resident who is part of the 2500+ Hawaiians that call Illinois home. 

Daniel Gaspar, was born and raised in the Kapa’akea homestead area, just outside of Kaunakakai. Now in his early sixties, Daniel attended Kaunakakai Elementary until the eighth grade and later graduated from Molokai High School.  He credits his parents, Daniel and Sadie Gaspar and hanai grandparents Lucy and Pedro Malic, for the success of his formidable years growing up in the small rural community.

After high school, Daniel attended the Church College of Hawaii on Maui and worked as a building missionary.  His experience in the field helped him become a contractor and building supervisor. A well-traveled man, Daniel has been to many countries and territories over this lifetime.   

In terms of life’s accomplishments, Daniel has dedicated his life to literacy.  "I am most proud of writing a book and short stories with the literacy program in Lake County, Illinois.  I wrote for Collections, which are stories from many students and it included my stories,"he said.  He is very active with the local literacy organization and serves on the Board of Directors of Literacy Volunteers of Lake County.  He has helped organize, support, and even performed at many literacy fundraisers like the: Hula Bowl, Luau for Literacy, and Walk for Literacy.

His first book, written in 2000, is called As the Wind Blows, for his efforts, he was awarded the Illinois Secretary of the State Student Achievement Award in 2000.  His tutor, Teta Minuzzo, also received that year’s Tutor of the Year Award. "The literacy program has given me many opportunities to attend many state and national literacy conferences.  I would like to encourage other people to do this too.  If I can do it, you can do it too," he attests. "No matter what other people say, there is a helping hand out there, called the literacy program.  So don’t be afraid."  A staunch advocate, he hopes to spread his message to Hawaii communities as well.

He recently completed a project titled The Twelve Days of Christmas, the old Hawaiian way. He put the words and song together as he learned it from back home as a child.  He notes that he is still trying to find a promoter to help publish and sell the book back home.  He hopes to come back to Molokai to promote the book and literacy in general. "I never forgot home.  Home always will be in my heart because Hawaii and Molokai are my home.  No matter where you go, no matter what you do, no matter what you say, always remember the words of the islands."

More than forty years after leaving Molokai, Daniel reports that he misses home and his ohana. "I miss the people, I miss the island smells, and the bread."  Daniel communicated with other"Hawaii transplants" through email and occasional phone calls.  There are always college-aged youths in the area for boot camp training.  He knows they feel homesick and comforts them with home-cooked meals and memories of home.   Daniel and his wife Tammy reside in Waukegan, Illinois and have eight children Ethan, Timmy, Kimberly, Mika, Tracy, Sean, Jonathan, and a five year old named Lilian Leilani.

Readers, who would like to contact Daniel to help with his book or his literacy campaign, can call us for more information.


As OHA Trustee, Colette was key in the acquisition of Waimea Park.

 
Email:colettemachado@gmail.com
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Kawaikapu watershed that will remain the same into perpetuity because of Colette's leadership.